*This article is part of a five-part series intent on raising money for those most significantly impacted by the current economic climate. While this piece is free to read, donations are still strongly encouraged. You can do so here.

On August 26th of 2020, amidst the bubbled NBA playoffs, the Milwaukee Bucks and Orlando Magic refused to play. …


An illustration for Edgar Allan Poe’s Descent into the Maelstrom, by Harry Clarke

Few pieces of popular literature will enjoy anything close to the effect Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde has had on our society. As both a piece of fiction in of itself and a separately understood entity within modern nomenclature, the understanding of a basic personal duality has allowed us to conceive of so much. …


A confused mess.

As the camera panned through the calm, empty corridors of the Nostromo, so too did the people watching. Whether audiences in 1979 knew it or not, Ridley Scott was doing the careful, calculated work of setting the basis for what remains a classic horror. By establishing a point of stasis for what’s later occupied by a panicked Ellen Ripley and a violently cavorting alien, the audience gets a greater experience of what the protagonist is feeling. …


Wouldst thou like to see the world?

It’s a sobering thought to imagine our way of life, the only one we can possibly know, could one day be looked upon with disdainful revision. As both the manner in which we conceive of things and the conditions that define them slowly becoming outdated by the endless tread of progress, it’s fair to imagine that, although people may one day learn of the times we live in, they’ll never truly understand them. Perhaps that’s why, when examining history as it’s often presented -in a linear fashion- past rationale can seem entirely alien. How people could have ever thought witches…


Crystal blue persuasion (yeah, yeah, yeahhhh)

There is, perhaps, no way to adequately express the shock emanating from this year’s best picture win. Bong Joon-Ho’s four-Oscar haul for Parasite in the year of our lord 2020 was momentous for so many reasons. Given the academy’s penchant for rewarding films that so often seem emblematic of their lack of touch, narrow-mindedness, and antiquated thought process, Parasite’s unprecedented victory as a foreign film exploring what the current domineering system of economic organization does to people across the financial divide feels, if but for a moment, like a powerful acknowledgment.

A lot of that recognition within critical circles is…


In March of 2019, physicists at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh performed an experiment. Initially proposed as a problem challenging a paradox of quantum mechanics, Eugene Wigner’s idea behind testing whether two irreconcilable realities can co-exist has long been but a thought in a Ph.D. candidate’s head.

Wigner, as it turns out, was right.

The findings, though contested by some, seem to confirm the possibility of multiple, irreconcilable realities at a quantum level. A harrowing possibility in and of itself, the mainstreamification of the results brought forth an interesting idea. …


It starts with a shudder.

When looking to re-tell some of the most significant moments in human history, textbooks, documentaries, and mediums that, at least in some way, look to try and uncolor the re-telling of history, do so with a feel for some kind of objectivity. Whether it’s for educational purposes or a simple yearning for some sort of unbiased exposition -however impossible that may prove to be -there are decisions made that service a more unidimensional look at certain events. …


A star.

Though movie-going as a whole is something of a dying medium, the space for certain kinds of films is rapidly shrinking. In the age of Marvel movies, what we’ve found people are willing to travel to the cinema for are galactic, serialized, blockbuster hits- at least more than anything else. Despite some recent golden examples, ones like Roma, Mid 90s, and The Farewell- films that celebrate their unique and highly specific message- there is an ever-increasing absence, at least in wide release, of movies that intentionally and drastically limit their target demographic.

Part of this is understandable. One of the…


There’s little comfort in knowing how something will end. A commonly asked party or road trip question is whether you’d want to know when and how you’ll die. Answers may forever differ, but the important part, however obvious, is the before. Everyone knows they’ll one day be gone. Whether we deal with this reality or how we do so is, in short, the history of the world, but what most are focused on is the in-between: Who we’ll fall in love with, what we’ll achieve, what we’ll discover.

The same kind of process-focused journey can be ascribed to anything within…


Italian theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli’s theory that time doesn’t exist is, at first glance, violently jarring. Though many of us probably already understand the logging of seconds, minutes, hours and so on, are arbitrary measures that only benefit the structure of our society, the suggestion that the very passage of time is, in fact, an illusion, is unsettling. In his book, The Order of Time, Rovelli lays out the case for a more materially defined concept of existence. Objects congregate in a particular order at a particular speed and interact with one another based on these and other conditions. …

Nicó Morales

Freelance football analyst and writer | Featured on NBCSN | host of The Weekly Rondo Podcast | inquiries: nickmorales25@me.com

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